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In an effort to increase foot traffic, business patronage and overall economic growth throughout our downtown core – while integrating strategies for more sustainable parking and enforcement operations – the City of Hermosa Beach is currently implementing a comprehensive ‘Pilot Parking Program’ through Dec. 15th. This 90-day program is comprised of three components:

 

    1)  Free daytime parking on select meters throughout the City's downtown between 11AM - 2PM, M-F. (Meters offering the free parking include all on-street credit-card operable 'smart' meters along Pier and Hermosa Avenues).

 

    2)  Expansion of 'smart' meter technology in the City via a trial of two industry-leading versions of parking meters (the Duncan 'Liberty', and IPS 'M5'). The side-by-side comparison of these meters offers staff and the public the opportunity to interface with these and ultimately provide valuable input as the City moves towards upgrading coin-only street meters. (To provide your input regarding these meters, please take our brief survey by selecting the 'surveys' tab above).

 

    3)  Implementation of 'Demand Pricing' (flexible hourly rates) throughout select lots and streets in the downtown area between the hours of 8PM - 12AM/2AM. 

 

We want to hear your constructive feedback regarding these components. Please be as specific as you can in your responses/recommendations. We will then aggregate the input collected and share with City officials as part of a larger presentation.

 

For a walking map of free parking locations click here.  For more information about the pilot parking program, component specs and revenue forecastings, check out our Pilot Parking Staff Report.

Questions? Please email: ndeanda@hermosabch.org

How do you view parking availability, parking options and enforcement operations within Hermosa Beach? How may we improve these? 

 

3 Responses

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Jim Sullivan over 5 years ago

Parking in HB is a challenge, let's face it. It requires great patience to drive up and down our streets looking for a space. I live east of PCH and think twice before heading downtown or to the beach because of the challenge. A large percentage of our street parking is used by residents who don't have parking where they live. During the summer some street parking is restricted unless you have a permit. HB's parking reputation outside of town is questionable, too. More than a few friends of ours are reluctant to visit because of the parking hassles. HB is also known for having the most aggressive and vigilant parking enforcement anywhere. Not surprising. Parking and parking enforcement represent the second highest revenue source for the city after property taxes. Property taxes are $11-$12 million a year. Parking meters and parking fines generate about $6 million about 15% of our total city budget. This puts the city in a quandary. We want to make it easier and cheaper to park but doing so could hurt city revenue. Will cheaper/free parking be offset by increased sales taxes because more people come to town to eat, drink and shop? The city must do this analysis.

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Justin Massey over 5 years ago

Jim gives a thoughtful response. I have never personally had to depend on street parking to get to downtown (because I had garage space), but I view the parking challenges as a sign that Hermosa is attracting lots of people, sort of like San Francisco or anywhere else with lots of demand and limited space for cars. Aside from building more capacity by building another garage, local capacity will always be limited, which will only get more full if some of the proposed hotels go in. So, the solutions will have to be creative and encourage folks not to drive into downtown. Not sure what those would be, but is there place to build more parking space along the Beach Cities Transit route and give people free fare on the bus if they show a parking receipt? Something like that might encourage interconnectivity among the beach cities, distribute the demand, encourage use of public transit, and minimize the cost of meeting the demand (because we'd be using an existing transit resource).

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Jill Hewes over 5 years ago

I would like to see the number of parking passes limited. The number sold exceed the number of spaces. Some how the city needs to encourage residents to use their garage to park in rather then using it as storage, office space or a recreation room. I have a single car garage and can fit tow cars in my driveway. A shuttle on the weekends and summer evenings may decrease the number of cars parking downtown.

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